Saturday, May 27, 2017

Where your fat is carried can predict cancer risk



CANCER DIGEST – May 27, 2017 – Scientists have found that carrying fat around your middle could be as good an indicator of cancer risk as body mass index (BMI), according to research published in the British Journal of Cancer.

This is the first study comparing adult body measurements in such a standardized way for obesity-related cancers. The study combined data from more than 43,000 participants who had been followed for an average of 12 years and more than 1,600 people were diagnosed with an obesity-related cancer.

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Nanovaccine shows promise for variety of cancers

Laser light is scattered by nanoparticles
in a solution of the UTSW-developed
nanovaccine. – Photo courtesy UTSW
CANCER DIGEST – May 17, 2017 – In another approach using nanotechnology to boost the body’s immune system to attack cancer, researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern’s Simmons Cancer Center, have shown in a proof-of-concept study that a nanovaccine extended survival in mouse models of a variety of cancers.

The study published online in the journal Nature Nanotechnology showed effective anti-tumor action in tumor models of melanoma, colorectal cancer, and HPV-related cancers of the cervix, head, neck and anogenital cancers.

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Reprogramming T cells on the fly to fight cancer


Dr. Matthias Stephan
CANCER DIGEST – May 10, 2017 – The idea of using the body’s own immune system to halt cancer has a long history of research approaches. One of the most promising in that vein over the last decade has been immunotherapy, and most recently the use of T cells engineered with chimeric antigen receptors or CAR T cells.

Saturday, April 29, 2017

Follow-up colonoscopy could substantially cut cancer risk


CANCER DIGEST – April 29, 2017 – As much as you might hate it, undergoing that follow-up colonoscopy might cut your risk of colorectal cancer by half, a new analysis of colonoscopy data shows.

British researchers looked at data for more than 250,000 patients and identified approximately 12,000 people who were diagnosed with intermediate-risk adenomas across 17 UK hospitals. These patients were monitored over an eight year period, and the incidence of bowel cancer was compared in those who had a follow-up colonoscopy with those who had not.

Saturday, April 22, 2017

Researcher closing in on less invasive colon cancer test

Manasi Shah, Ph.D.
CANCER DIGEST – April 22, 2017 – If you’ve ever undergone a colonoscopy, you know why researchers are looking for a less invasive way to screen for colorectal cancer. 

Colonoscopy is currently the gold standard for detecting cancer, but it is a 2-day procedure that is expensive and dreaded by many. Patients need to drink a disagreeable laxative preparation to clean out the colon one day before the doctor threads a flexible colonscope through the intestines to look for and removing suspicious polyps